Edible Public Spaces

apple tree

About 4 years ago, when the recession splashed over, I wandered through the city, observing the green areas of the public spaces between the blocks of flats, with trees and bushes and asked myself why don’t those people plant fruit trees and fruit bushes there, so they can have fruits when they need. They could have fruits all spring, summer and early autumn. An maybe the lines in front of the humanitarian warehouses would be a bit shorter.

Many fruit trees grow high and bear lots of fruits, like apple trees, cherries, pears, plums, apricots, mulberries, figs, persimmons, peaches, jujubes, cornels, carobs, strawberry trees and others (in the other climate areas), and don’t need lots of tending, and don’t need to be sprayed with phytopharmaceuticals. For some years I forgot about that walk to the town that brought me that very thought.

And guess what? Two years later I was browsing the internet and I could only ask myself if someone was reading my mind when I saw this:

http://mundraub.org/

http://obststadt.at

Toothpaste

A decade ago I read a book written by Waris Dirie, where she describes how they brushed their teeth in the desert with a tooth stick made out of Neem tree (Salvadora persica). Until then I didn’t pay much attention to the toothpaste, except that I wanted as much herbs in there as possible. Later I found out that in Europe people brushed their teeth with mastic tree (Pistacia Lentiscus or Pistacia Therebintus) tooth sticks or with sticks made of Hazelnut bush. Oil made of mastic gum or leaves helps to keep the teeth in place and prevents paradontosis and kills the bacteria Heliobacter Pylori – as some of the studies state.  While in India people used the Neem tree (Salvadora persica).

http://www.google.si/books?hl=sl&lr=&id=y3_vZIUVVj8C&oi=fnd&pg=PA1&dq=sugarcane+medicinal+properties&ots=nqBme2M_1h&sig=Z0N0BB4nN_CVMZDRL1y844-zAso&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=sugarcane%20medicinal%20properties&f=false

Well, they certainly didn’t have problems with bacteria loaded toothbrushes – we should disinfect them in alcohol solution, I guess.

Just recently I stumbled upon an explanation that Chinese traditional medicine considers teeth as the endpoints of the meridians.

Here is a Meridian Tooth Chart:  http://www.meridiantoothchart.com/tooth_charts.html

What I did notice though is that after using very natural toothpaste (bought or self-made) for some years it also had a healing and soothing effect on my intestines. Actually it worked like daily medicine for my alimentary canal, while the ordinary toothpastes work just the opposite.

Together with the explanation of teeth in TCM I also found an interesting German Tooth gel with 35 various etheric oils to activate each meridian of the teeth. I haven’t tried it, so don’t consider this as an advertisement. It is maybe worth considering this thing called daily mouth hygiene – do we help our intestines with it?

Thermal Depolymerisation (TDP) of Waste

I’m not very knowledgeable in chemistry. Yet the thermal depolymerisation of waste video »400$ Billion Dollar Secret« drew my attention. It looks like advertorial to me. But nevertheless we should consider processing waste and sludge in this way than by burning or burying it or other ways currently used, if the presented data on TDP is correct. The presented process shows processing of waste back into gasoline, fuel and other materials. Yet despite the relief to know that something more thorough and efficient then common practices is possible it was awkward to watch how an assembly line of turkey that duration limit has exceeded entering the thermal depolymerisation. We can easily imagine other living beings in such situation.

For decades I live nearby a city waste dump. Now it is closed, grass over its surface, and it produces fuel for the nearby urban setting. Before using it as a source of fuel it started burning repeatedly. Fire workers had to put out the fire quite often. Before it became a dump the huge hole was used as a gravel pit and a local swimming option; it was surrounded by fields, small forests and meadows. After the local authorities decided to use it to dump the waste from one major and some smaller cities, all wells downstream were polluted, people and animals stared getting sick, the vegetables were of dubious quality and the stank spread all around. After it was closed the local authorities couldn’t find another place for dumping city waste, so they packaged it in bales and stored it nearby highway and cemetery, and the same thing happened again except fires – people got sick, the stank was all around, it polluted the underground water.

So after reading about this thermal depolymerisation option I asked myself why don’t the people in charge use this option in combination with packing waste in bales. Well, maybe my idea is just too outlandish.

More on this topic:

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2003/may/22/research.highereducation1

http://www.sovereignty.org.uk/features/eco/zwaste2.html